Something in the Water

As many winter sports flounder, NGBs look to American swimming for answers… 

Don’t let the medal count fool you. At the Winter Games in Sochi, Team USA finished second in the medal standings, five back from beleaguered host Russia. They won 28 total medals, nine of them gold. It took 255 opportunities to win those 28 medals – a rather unimpressive batting average of .109.

Of those 28 medals, a dozen came in either freestyle skiing or snowboarding, and five of their nine gold came in brand new Olympic events introduced in 2014. Translation: NBC must be immensely grateful for the X-Games… Anyway you cut it, Team USA is guilty of medal-padding, by adding American-made pseudo-events like the “slopestyles” on skis and snowboards. It’s hard not to be cynical when you look at some of these less-than-universal sports, and then have to listen to the manufactured drama over national medal counts.

In the traditional Winter Olympics sports, the Americans were, to put it mildly, underwhelming. Speedskating was a well-publicized disaster, as US skaters failed to win a single medal on ice in 32 opportunities, and no, it wasn’t Under Armour’s fault. Ice Dancing gold aside, they weren’t particularly impressive in figure skating either, winning just two medals in 13 opportunities.

But before the bashing continues, this column isn’t about the failures of American Winter Olympians. It’s about the outsized success of American athletes in melted ice. In the pool. See, this is about the time when leaders of National Governing Bodies in many winter sports start scratching their heads and wondering what went wrong. Then, they look to a group that continues to do it right. They ring up the folks at USA Swimming and they all ask a simple riddle: How the hell do you guys manage to be so good, Games after Games?

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